Registration

Tracks

There are 5 different tracks for the National Wilderness Skills Institute including, Traditional Skills, Visitor Use, Wilderness I, Wilderness II, and Wild and Scenic Rivers. Three types of sessions do not have a specific track including, Coffee Hour, All Track Combined, and Happy Hour sessions. Find the descriptions for all of the tracks below.  

Track Description
Coffee Hour

Join us each morning as we start the day with a brief welcome and updates followed by various topical discussions including regional breakouts, exploring native land acknowledgements, research, global initiatives, field mapping, and micro-mentoring.

All Tracks Combined

A few larger sessions have been developed that cross all tracks including the opening keynote session, exploring public lands management, history, and conservation with a focus on telling a more inclusive narrative, funding programs, review of the week, and a closing discussion around take-aways and next steps.

Traditional Skills Provides a foundation for the skills needed to work in a wilderness setting. With an overview of hand tools, using pack stock, trail maintenance techniques, crosscut use, field leadership and backpacking and backcountry nutrition, participants will have a solid foundation for some actual time in the field to practice these skills.
Visitor Use  Provides participants with the tools needed to adapt to a variety of challenges and opportunities that are present in current land management settings. These sessions will go from the theoretical to the applied with an overview of the Visitor Use Management Framework and a variety of lessons from the field.
Wilderness I Join us on a journey from the beginnings of the Wilderness Act through the foundations that guide wilderness stewardship today.  Learn from experienced instructors working in a variety of wilderness settings who will share their expertise in the fundamentals of wilderness history, character, values, benefits, science, and prohibited uses.  Leave No Trace instructors will lead us through outdoor skills, ethics, and provide teaching tools for responsible recreation.
Wilderness II

Building upon content covered in the Wilderness I sessions, the courses in this track dives deeper into Wilderness Stewardship Performance (WSP) elements, Wilderness Character Monitoring (WCM), and Minimum Requirements Analyses (MRA/MRDG).

Wild and Scenic Rivers This track assists agency personnel and partners learn more about the management of Wild & Scenic Rivers (WSRs). Courses explore the history of the WSR Act, core competencies and management principles for field staff, wildfire within WSR corridors, and the network of organizations working to protect and defend existing and potential WSRs.
Happy Hour

End each day with informal and relaxed hangouts ranging from reflecting on the keynote message, testing your wilderness and river knowledge in a friendly game of trivia, join us for movie night, and sharing your story around a virtual campfire with your regional peers.

    *All times in Eastern Time Zone

    Monday, May 24

    Time Track Session Description Speakers
    11:00 AM All Tracks Combined

    Welcome

    Keynote

    Join us as we kick-off the National Wilderness Skills Institute followed by an in-depth discussion with Dr. Drew Lanham. He is a cultural and conservation ornithologist whose work addresses the confluence of race, place, and nature. Drew is an accredited author, a lifelong bird watcher and hunter-conservationist living in Seneca, South Carolina.

    Dr. Drew Lenham
    12:30 PM All Tracks Combined Public Lands in the US - A More Inclusive Examination In this interactive virtual class, we'll explore public lands management, history, and conservation with a focus on telling a more inclusive narrative. Participants will:
    • Review the definition of public lands and management of public lands.
    • Understand that the common historical narrative of public lands has done little to reckon with the sometimes atrocious means by which public lands were created.
    • Explore how social and political movements affected and continue to affect how and for whom public lands were and are created.
    • Learn about some of the historic and current contributions that Black people, Indigenous people, and People of Color have had and continue to have in the conservation movement.
    Paul Sanford, Liz Vogel, & Sharon Musa
    2:00 PM Traditional Skills Mastering the Basics: An Examination of the Physics, Nuances, and Mechanics of Traditional Skills

    This session provides participants an opportunity to learn from traditional tool experts with a focus on learning how to use a tool rather than just learning the “how to do it” technique.  The foundational teaching by these experts puts more emphasis on the science, physics and dynamics of the work and the proper shape, size, and balance of the tool.  This understanding improves efficiency and safety of tool use regardless if tool users are new to the skill set or have years of experience.  There is nothing easy about using traditional tools, it is hard work, but improving proficiency of tool use enhances the experience and promotes the recognition of value in the work and tools used in wilderness.

    Bob Beckley, Dolly Chapman, Aaron Klug, Jeremy Watkins, Susan Jenkins, Doug Hunt, Jessica Kehoe
    2:00 PM Visitor Use  The Wonderful World of Visitor Use Management Are you frustrated by visitor behavior? Do you want to address management challenges in a meaningful way that lasts? Do you feel like you're lacking the tools and information you need to tackle visitor use challenges? This session will provide an introduction to Visitor Use Management and to valuable tools that will help you tackle Visitor Use Management challenges big and small. Linda Marigliano
    2:00 PM Wilderness II Wilderness Stewardship Performance Overview Provide attendees background of the Wilderness Stewardship Performance (WSP) measure, results from the first six years, accomplishment trends, and funding opportunities. From this presentation, participants will gain a better understanding of Wilderness Stewardship Performance, where to find resources, and possible funding opportunities. (Note: This class is also presented on Friday, May 28th at 1:00-1:50 pm). Eric Sandeno & Dusty Vaughn
    2:30 PM Wilderness I How and Why the Wilderness Act Became Law We will explore the cultural shifts that happened to launch a system of public commons, and how that shift and a vision of the future informed the subsequent movement to secure wild public lands within the framework of the larger public domain. We will explore critical moments and crucial characters, while laying open the fissures and cracks left to us by those that advocated for what we serve today.   Bill Hodge
    3:00 PM Wilderness II Wilderness Character Monitoring A look at wilderness character monitoring history, development, overview, and an interagency update. Dr. Peter Landres, Julie King, Mike Smith, Kaitlin de Varona, Peter Mali, Roger Semler, Peter Keller, Marissa Edwards
    3:30 PM Traditional Skills Trail Maintanence Basics for Field Staff An overview of definitions of common terms, some details of trail clearing and basic tread, and a run through of the most common trail tools. this is targeted at the novice trail maintainer. Jessica May & Kerry Wood
    3:30 PM Wild and Scenic Rivers History of Wild & Scenic Rivers Act This course will explain the events that contributed to the passage of the Wild & Scenic Rivers (WSR) Act, discuss the importance of the WSR Act, describe the key primary concepts included in the WSR Act, and describe the role of federal land management agencies in implementing the WSR Act. Ed Krumpe & LuVerne Gruessing
    3:30 PM Wilderness I Wilderness Act 101 This presentation is targeted to first or second year seasonal wilderness rangers, volunteers and those that are new to wilderness stewardship.  The power-point will focus on the fundamentals of the Wilderness Act, specifically section 2 and 4 of the Law.  It will also address the "why" wilderness was needed in 1964 and for future generations.  The presentation will conclude with the challenges forthcoming, including climate change, intervention and the need to "Let it Be." Ralph Swain
    4:00 PM Visitor Use Lessons from the Field - Visitor Use Management on the Appalachian Trail I'll describe the history of VUM on the Appalachian Trail (A.T.), Appalachian Trail Conservancy's (ATC) adoption of the Interagency Visitor Use Management Council's (IVUMC) Visitor Use Management (VUM) planning framework, give some examples of A.T. VUM planning work, and describe ATC's strategic VUM plan for future A.T. VUM work. Morgan Sommerville
    5:00 PM Happy Hour Happy Hour - Keynote Discussion

    Join us as we spend time exploring the messages shared in the keynote discussion with Dr. Drew Lanham. What role do we each play in promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion and what connection does this have to stewarding Wilderness and Wild & Scenic Rivers?

    Bill Hodge

    Tuesday, May 25

    Time Track Session Description Speakers
    11:00 AM Coffee Hour Coffee Hour - Regional Breakouts

    Join a breakout room based on your location to participate in regional presentations, group discussions, and project showcases. The goal is to build relationships that hopefully result in some synergy moving forward on projects or future regional training events.

     
    12:00 PM Traditional Skills Crosscut Saws I Day one we will cover personal protective equipment, equipment requirements, human factors, and the five-step cutting process: Objective, Hazards/obstacles, Leans/binds, Escape paths, and Cut plan (OHLEC). We will also present an overview of the USDA Forest Service Saw Program. Pete Duncan
    12:00 PM Visitor Use WISDOM: A Six-Step Process for Effective Public Contacts and Authority of the Resource

    Learning how to make professional public contacts with wilderness visitors is truly an art and a science that comes with experience.  However, managers and rangers can improve their techniques by using a systematic six-step process called WISDOM that has been field-tested and used in congressionally designated wildernesses throughout America. Following the WISDOM presentation, a separate follow-up Authority of the Resource Technique (ART) presentation will conduct role-playing skits using volunteers from the audience to reinforce the six-step process. The ART presentation is intended to be interactive.

    Ralph Swain & Jack Adar
    12:00 PM Wild and Scenic Rivers Wilderness/WSR Fire Resource Advisors (READs)

    This course will include a brief introduction into what a Fire Resource Advisors (READ) is, how they are related to Wilderness and Wild & Scenic Rivers (WWS) specifically, some of what a WWSR READ does, why that is important to WWSR management, and how people can get started on this path if they are interested.

    Dylan McCoy
    12:30 PM Wild and Scenic Rivers Wildfire Incidents and Wild & Scenic River Resource Considerations This session will focus on Wild and Scenic Rivers (WSR) in the context of Wildland Fire Incident Management.   The presentation will review the requirements of the WSR Act, consider river specific resource protection measures during a wildland fire incident, and examine the framework for integrating river resources into the overall incident management strategy.  This session will benefit a  wide range of river professionals and resource specialists tasked with ensuring the protection of river values before, during, and after a wildland fire.   Kai Allen
    12:30 PM Wilderness II Wilderness Stewardship Performance - Natural Role of Fire Provide attendees details about the five scoring components, with specific examples, of the Natural Role of Fire Wilderness Stewardship Performance element.  From this presentation, participants will gain a better understanding of the Natural Role of Fire element and deliverables needed to improve element scores.   Frankie Romero & Colter Pence
    1:30 PM Visitor Use Monitoring Campsite and Trail Conditions This presentation will address how monitoring can supply a Visitor Use Management process with accurate information about campsite and trail conditions to evaluate thresholds/standards of quality and aid in selecting corrective actions and evaluating their efficacy. The bulk of the talk will be focused on developing and implementing effective monitoring programs, with helpful guidance for both program leaders and field staff. 

    Dr. Jeff Marion & Dr. Jeremy Wimpey

    1:30, 2:30, 3:30 PM Wild and Scenic Rivers I, II, II Beyond the Banks - Understanding Your Wild & Scenic River  Field staff implement law, agency policy and regulation often without realizing their day to day work is designed to align with broader goals and objectives. Understanding the requirements for stewarding a Wild and Scenic River and the management plans that provide the basis for how and why Wild and Scenic Rivers are managed increases knowledge of field level practitioners creating ownership and lasting stewardship of the resource. This session focuses on the fundamentals of managing a Wild and Scenic River.   Steve Chesterton, Kristen Thrall, Tangy Wiseman, Liz Townley
    2:30 PM Visitor Use Management Case Studies: Resolving the Worst Appalachian Trail Camping Impacts This presentation will present and discuss three cases studies where management-science collaborations sought to resolve the recognized “worst” Appalachian Trail camping locations by shifting camping from popular flat areas, where campsite proliferation and expansion had created unacceptably large “mega-clusters” of campsites and impact, to sustainable side-hill campsites in sloping terrain. The cases studies are Annapolis Rocks vista, Maryland, Slaughter Gap, Georgia, and Hawk Mtn Shelter, Georgia; the “lessons-learned” from each will be shared and discussed.  Dr. Jeff Marion & Morgan Sommerville
    2:30 PM Wilderness I Understanding Wilderness Character Brief overview of wilderness character - how it is defined, why it matters, and what each of the 5 qualities is about. How is wilderness character used with emphasis on use at field level - communication, education.  Linda Merigliano
    2:30 PM Wilderness II Wilderness Stewardship Performance - Recreation Sites Provide attendees details about the five scoring components, with specific examples, of the Recreation Sites Wilderness Stewardship Performance element.  From this presentation, participants will gain a better understanding of the Recreation Sites element and deliverables needed to improve element scores.   Stacey Duke & Eric Sandeno
    3:30 PM Traditional Skills Pack Stock I

    This session will introduce participants to the capabilities of pack stock and their role in managing public lands throughout the nation.  We will also discuss safely working around stock, including horse psychology, stock on the trail, all the way up to some of the safety factors that packers consider when putting a string together.  Interact with a panel of professional USFS packers.

    Pack Stock Center for Excellence, Ken Graves, Michael Morse, Katy Bartzokis, Debbie Mcdougald
    3:30 PM Visitor Use Lessons from the Field - Digital Kiosks and Visitor Use Management USDA Forest Service Northern Region digital kiosk program: Explanation and background of what digital kiosks are, and how digital kiosks can assist with visitor use management. How can we think of new ways to use this technology to encourage certain visitor use patterns?  Chrysann Jaeger
    3:30 PM Wilderness I Wilderness Values, Four Cornerstones, and Benefits This session will look in depth at the Four Cornerstones of wilderness stewardship (preserve wildness and natural conditions; provide and use the minimum necessary; manage wilderness as a whole; and protect wilderness benefits).  These foundational principles will be connected with values that are fundamental to those who work in wilderness as well as visit these special lands for diverse reasons.  The final cornerstone, protection of wilderness benefits, will lead into discussion of a timely report on wilderness benefits to present and future generations of wilderness visitors and for those who value wilderness from afar.    Ken Straley & Jason Taylor
    3:30 PM Wilderness II Wilderness Character Monitoring - Implementing WCM with the Forest Service Implementing the Wilderness Character Monitoring (WCM) framework with the USDA Forest Service including legislative and administrative document compilation, narrative writing, measure selection, the USDA Forest Service WCM Technical Guide, and baseline assessment report writing (Wilderness Stewardship Performance points 2-8). Kaitlin de Varona, Mike Smith, Jacob Wall
    5:00 PM Happy Hour Happy Hour - Trivia Night

    Join us for a fun evening of wilderness and wild & scenic rivers trivia! We will be using KaHoot! to host the game while sharing a screen with the questions and results. Instructions for joining the game are in the program.

    Peter Irvine & Dusty Vaughn

     

    Wednesday, May 26

    Time Track Session Description Speakers
    11:00 AM Coffee Hour Coffee Hour - Exploring Native Land Acknowledgements Discussion will center around the concept of native land acknowledgements and offer resources and reflection points for Wilderness and Wild & Scenic Rivers staff wanting to explore this. Colter Pence & Dr. Serra Hoagland
    12:00 PM Traditional Skills Crosscut Saws II Day two will explore binds and tension, setting your cut, compound cuts and spring polls. Bill Hodge
    12:00 PM Wilderness II 10 Year Trail Shared Stewardship Challenge This session will include an overview of the national trail program (who's who and what we're all working on), and a synopsis of the 10 Year Trail Shared Stewardship Challenge (why it's needed, how it's structured, and what to expect).  Brenda Yankoviak
    12:00, 1:30, 2:30 PM  Wild and Scenic Rivers Assessing and Developing Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities for River Rangers I, II, III Learn about core competencies, knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) needed for entry level river ranger work, in order to develop a personal development and training plan, and then identify resources to develop those KSAs.  This session will be shared in three modules: 1) Review the Interagency Wild and Scenic Rivers Coordinating Council Technical Core Competencies for River Management Specialists and Non-Specialists paper, 2) Assess your own river KSAs, 3) Learn about resources to further develop your KSAs. Colter Pence & Angie Fuhrmann
    12:30 PM Visitor Use Lessons from the Field - Providing Up to Date Trail Conditions Via Electronic Formats An overview of mapping products that deliver real-time information to the public at large. ArcGIS online, trails data, maintenance schedules and reporting. Joshua Simpson
    12:30 PM Wilderness II Wilderness Stewardship Performance - Trails Provide attendees details about the five scoring components, with specific examples, of the Trails Wilderness Stewardship Performance element.  From this presentation, participants will gain a better understanding of the Trails element and deliverables needed to improve element scores. Brenda Yankoviak
    1:30 PM Visitor Use Solitude Monitoring

    Dr. Troy Hall will present on the legislative process involved in the passage of the Wilderness Act to explore how “outstanding opportunities” and its parts were historically understood. Specifically, Dr. Hall will dissect the parts of the phrase “outstanding opportunities for solitude or a primitive and unconfined type of recreation” (from Section 2[c] of the Wilderness Act) through an examination of how the terms “solitude,” “rugged,” “primitive,” and “unconfined” were represented and likely understood by participants in the wilderness bill hearings.

    Dr. Troy Hall
    2:30 PM Wilderness I Prohibited Uses and the Exceptions to Them This session will review the Wilderness Act prohibitions, exceptions to them and special provisions. James Sippel
    2:30 PM Wilderness II Wilderness Stewardship Performance - Opportunities for Solitude Provide attendees details about the five scoring components, with specific examples, of the Opportunities for Solitude Wilderness Stewardship Performance element.  From this presentation, participants will gain a better understanding of the Opportunities for Solitude element and deliverables needed to improve element scores.   Dr. Troy Hall
    3:30 PM Traditional Skills Trail Management Objectives on the Trail: An Introduction to the Backend of Trail Work This session will review Trail Management Objectives (TMO) in the context of field work and accomplishment reporting. The goal is to explain some of the national standardization of our trails system while acknowledging local variation. It is also meant to connect what field workers are doing on the ground with the bigger picture of trail system management. If you are novice to trail work it will be helpful for you to take the Trail Maintenance Basics for Field Staff prior to attending this session. Jessica May
    3:30 PM Wilderness I Leave No Trace Outdoor Skills & Ethics - Introductory This course provides an overview of Leave No Trace (LNT) principles that protect the outdoors while minimizing our impacts to the land, soil, vegetation, water, wildlife, cultural resources and other visitors. Participants will learn about LNT guidelines to practice, promote and share whether in the backcountry, frontcountry, your favorite local parks, and natural areas or in your everyday life. Participants will also be introduced to programs and resources of the LNT Center for Outdoor Ethics and ways to get more involved. Lastly, the course will cover LNT recommendations to keep ourselves, our communities and our outdoor spaces safe and healthy during COVID-19. Erin Collier & Brice Esplin
    3:30 PM Wilderness II Wilderness Character Monitoring - Support & Resources An introduction to the Forest Service WCM Central Team roles and responsibilities as well as a look at resources available to staff working on wilderness character monitoring. Julie King, Jim Edmonds, Mike Smith, Kaitlin de Varona, Drew Lindsey, Portia Jelinek
    5:00 PM Happy Hour Happy Hour - Movie Night: "The Dark Divide"

    Join us for movie night as we watch “The Dark Divide” featuring David Cross and Debra Messing!

    "The Dark Divide” is based on the true story of renowned butterfly expert Dr. Robert Pyle’s (David Cross) perilous 1995 journey across one of America’s largest undeveloped wildlands. At the urging of his dying wife Thea (Debra Messing), the shy author finds himself in over his head on an epic, life-changing expedition through Washington’s Gifford Pinchot National Forest in search of new species of butterflies. Over the course of his six-week adventure Pyle battles self-doubt, the grueling trail, and the people and creatures who call this forest home. And, somewhere deep in the heart of The Dark Divide, he makes a discovery that challenges everything he knows about the natural world.

    Preregistration is required. Check the program for more information on how to preregister.

    David Cross, Debra Messing, Tom Putnam, Dr. Robert Michael Pyle

     

    Thursday, May 27

    Time Track Session Description Speakers
    11:00 AM Coffee Hour Coffee Hour - Topic Breakouts

    Three Zoom breakout rooms including:

    Wilderness Research: This session will be an informal discussion, focused on addressing questions from attendees about the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, the use of science to support Wilderness or other public lands stewardship, science careers at resource management agencies, and other questions about research related to Wilderness.

    International & Global Initiatives: Learn about various initiatives that are building global movements to protect wild places and rivers.

    Field Maps and Mobile GIS Familiarization: Go over capabilities of Field Maps mobile data collection application and some examples of how this has been applied to Wilderness management efforts on a high-complexity unit.

    Jason Taylor, Adam Hanson, Dylan McCoy
    12:00 PM Traditional Skills Crosscut Saws III Day three will cover use and maintenance of the saw, ergonomics in using the saw, saw types and handle types. Dave Haberl
    12:00 PM Visitor Use The Sustainable Camping & Trail Management Toolbox This presentation will discuss the use-impact relationship and it’s implications for managing visitor use to minimize resource impacts. Management begins by developing a sustainable infrastructure of trails and campsites so we will discuss the most influential attributes that makes these features sustainable and how maintenance can enhance their sustainability.  Next we will discuss visitor use management options, such as camping management options (dispersed, established site, and designated site), trail management options (pairing type of use to trails that are sustainable for each use), and when redistributing or limiting visitor use is necessary. Finally we will discuss the role of visitor education and Leave No Trace practices.  Dr. Jeff Marion
    12:00 PM Wilderness II Introduction to "This is Who We Are"

    Learn about the USDA Forest Service’s “This Is Who We Are” program with engagement and reflection around the agency’s mission, purpose, and core values.  There will be facilitated discussion intended to help participants envision how they and others deliver on the Forest Service’s mission and core values.  All Forest Service employees AND partners are welcome.

    Colter Pence
    1:30 PM Traditional Skills Leaders Intent for Backcountry Leadership

    How to give and seek Leader’s Intent in moving and dynamic situations, give Field Briefings to others, and facilitate After Action Reviews.

    Colter Pence

    1:30 PM Visitor Use Lessons from the Field - The Central Cascades Wilderness Permit System The Central Cascades Wilderness Permit System is a joint project between the Deschutes and Willamette National Forests to limit entry on both day and overnight use within three Wilderness areas in order to protect them for current and future generations.  This presentation gives a brief history of the project and what the system looks like as it is implemented in May of 2021.

    Jason Fisher

    1:30 PM Wilderness II Minimum Requirements Analysis/MRDG Overview of Minimum Requirement Analysis, where it comes from, why we do it, and tips for how to complete the Minimum Requirement Decision Guide (MRDG). Dan Abbe, Dan Morris, & John Campbell
    2:30 PM Visitor Use To Permit or Not to Permit: Addressing Visitor Capacity Have you ever thought to yourself,  "What is visitor capacity and how do I determine the visitor capacity of an area?" or "How would I even go about addressing visitor capacity?" or "A permit system would solve everything!"  This session will provide an introduction to visitor capacity and will provide some useful tools and a framework that will help you navigate the complex world of visitor capacity. Katy Nelson
    3:30 PM Traditional Skills Backpacking & Backcountry Nutrition

    Katie has been Crew Member, Crew Leader, Field Operations Coordinator and Program Manager for backcountry programs in virtually every landscape across our public lands and she will share the what and how of packing your pack for extended time in the wilderness. Jesse has led and prepared crews for extended hitches in the backcountry and has established some best practices for preparing for feeding diverse (and hungry) crews, with critical decisions coming before ever leaving the workstation.  

    Katie Courier, Jessica Satterfield

    3:30 PM Wilderness I Leave No Trace - Teaching Tools for Responsible Recreation

    This course is designed for park and recreation staff, outdoor educators, and guides who will gain skills and knowledge to incorporate Leave No Trace (LNT) into their work as well as teach LNT to all experience levels and in varied environments. Participants will receive an overview of LNT principles, practices and ethics, including both the hows and whys behind the importance of practicing LNT. Participants will learn about LNT guidelines to practice, promote and share whether in the backcountry, frontcountry, your favorite local parks or in your everyday life. Instructors will cover tips, tools and best practices for effectively communicating and teaching LNT to others (both online and in-person), including interactive activities and techniques such as Authority of the Resource. They will also review programs and resources of the LNT Center for Outdoor Ethics and ways to get more involved. Lastly, participants will learn about LNT recommendations to keep ourselves, our communities and our outdoor spaces safe and healthy during COVID-19.

    NOTE: Participants who are new to LNT or have not had LNT training in recent years are encouraged to participate in the Wed. May 26th Introductory session or complete the self-paced (30-45 min.) LNT Online Awareness Course in advance: LNT.org/online-awarenesscourse/.

    Erin Collier & Brice Esplin
    3:30 PM Wilderness II Wilderness Stewardship Performance - Agency Management Actions Provide attendees details about the five scoring components, with specific examples, of the Agency Management Actions Wilderness Stewardship Performance element.  From this presentation, participants will gain a better understanding of the Agency Management Actions element and deliverables needed to improve element scores.  Bjorn Fredrickson & Colter Pence
    5:00 PM Happy Hour Happy Hour - Regional Virtual Campfire Chats

    Join a breakout room based on your location to participate in regional presentations, group discussions, and project showcases. The goal is to build relationships that hopefully result in some synergy moving forward on projects or future regional training events.

     

     

    Friday, May 28

    Time Track Session Description Speakers
    11:00 AM Coffee Hour Coffee Hour - Micro-Mentoring

    Get connected with a National Wilderness Skills Mentor to schedule for a micro-mentoring session.  Micro-mentoring is typically 1 short (30-45 minute) session where a mentor and mentoree discuss perspectives, career goals, leadership, and personal challenges.  Mentorees are encouraged to share with the mentoree before the mentoring session occurs a resume and a brainstorm of things they would like to discuss with the mentor.  We will use the session at NWSI to match mentors and mentorees, and coach mentorees on how to be best prepared for the mentoring session they will then schedule. Find the list of mentors here

    Colter Pence
    12:00 PM Traditional Skills Crosscut Saws IV Day four will be a tool overview, sharpening of the saw, and a recap of the week.  Pete Duncan, Bill Hodge, & Dave Haberl
    12:00 PM All Tracks Combined Funding Programs

    We will hear from a panel of guests, all of whom have a connection to funding programs specific for wilderness and trail stewardship projects.

    Randy Welsh, Dusty Vaughn, Brenda Yankoviak, Sharon Seim, Kerry Morse
    1:00 PM Visitor Use

    Lessons from the Field - Overcoming Challenges and Continuous Improvement in Wyoming's Snake River Canyon

    Visitor use reached over 200,000 boaters a season in the Snake River Canyon during the 1990's. While the quality of the river experience was dropping, conflicts were on the rise and stakeholders demanded change. Please join for a discussion of initial interventions and fine tuning that has followed.

    David Cernicek
    1:00 PM Wilderness I Wilderness Stewardship Performance Provide attendees background of the Wilderness Stewardship Performance measure, results from the first six years, accomplishment trends, and funding opportunities.  From this presentation, participants will gain a better understanding of Wilderness Stewardship Performance, where to find resources, and possible funding opportunities. (Note: this class is also presented on Monday, May 24th at 2:00-2:50 pm) Eric Sandeno & Dusty Vaughn
    1:30 PM Traditional Skills Pack Stock II

    This session will demonstrate and compare methods of packing the three pack saddles most commonly used in the United States: sawbuck, Salmon River, and decker.  Watch demonstrations and join packers for what is sure to be a lively discussion comparing the advantages of each saddle.

    USDA Forest Service Region 5 Pack Stock Center for Excellence;  Doug Hunt, Ken Graves, Katy Bartzokis, Debbie Mcdougald
    2:00 PM Wild and Scenic Rivers Wild & Scenic Rivers Coalition The mission of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Coalition is to protect and defend existing and potential Wild and Scenic Rivers and broaden the movement for their conservation by raising awareness about their value in terms of building greater capacity for river organizations to be more effective in advocating for Wild and Scenic protections; protecting and defending designated and potential Wild and Scenic Rivers and support the non-profit and agency river professionals who steward them, and improving communications amongst river organizations and with the public about the value of Wild and Scenic Rivers.  Risa Shimoda
    2:00 PM Wilderness I Introduction to Wilderness Character Monitoring An introduction to wilderness character, the five wilderness character qualities, and an overview of the wilderness character monitoring framework. Julie King, Mike Smith, & Kaitlin de Varona
    2:00 PM Wilderness II Wilderness Stewardship Performance - Round Robin

    Provide participants a quick 15-minute overview of specific Wilderness Stewardship Performance elements as well as example deliverables associated with that element.  From this presentation, participants will gain a better understanding of each element presented and deliverables needed to improve element scores.

    Eric Sandeno, Nancy Taylor, Kelly Pearson, Christina Boston, Lee Johnson
    3:00 PM All Tracks Combined What We Learned

    This session will take participants through a review of what was the 2021 National Wilderness Skills Institute. With a focus on having fun and making sure this community of practice stays connected we will provide some highlights from the week.

    Bill Hodge
    4:00 PM Happy Hour Happy Hour - Take Aways & Next Steps

    This week wasn’t what we wanted to do…or was it? We all came into this knowing that this training session was a needed replacement for what we would have rather done in person and within our local landscape. But what did work about the week and is there a need for some bigger connection in future years? Let’s spend one last zoom session together and toast to the Wilderness and Wild & Scenic River adventures ahead!!

    Core Team

    Pre-Class Reading

    Public Lands in the U.S. - A More Inclusive Examination

    There is a required reading to complete prior to this session. Please reserve one-two hours to read the document in the link: 

    Mastering the Basics: An Examination of the Physics, Nuances, and Mechanics of Traditional Skill 

    Reccomended pre-work for this session includes:

    Hot off the Press

    Posters

    Videos

    Publications

     

    If you have any questions please email Jacob Wall (j.wall@wildernessstewardship.org). 

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